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American History Songs

from the War Between the States to World War I


Andrew Johnson
1865-1869

Ulysses S. Grant
1869-1872 1st Term
1873-1877 2nd Term

Rutherford B. Hayes
1865-1869

James A. Garfield
1881

Chester Arthur
1881-1885

Grover Cleveland
1885-1889 1st Term

Benjamin Harrison
1889-1893

Grover Cleveland
1893-1897 2nd Term

William McKinley
1897-1900 1st term
1901 2nd term cut short

Theodore Roosevelt
1901-1904 1st term
1905-1909 2nd term


William H. Taft
1909-1913

Woodrow Wilson
1913-1917 1st term
1917-1921 2nd term

Andrew Johnson
17th President
1865-1869

Stephen Foster's music was still very popular !

Old Folks at Home Stephen Foster

Oh ! Susanna (1848) Stephen Foster

My Old Kentucky Home (1852)
Stephen Foster

Jeanie with the Light Brown Hair (1854) Stephen Foster

Beautiful Dreamer (1864)
Stephen Foster

Sweet Genevieve (1869)
George Cooper*

Man On the Flying Trapeze (1868)
George Leybourne
 

 

Old Folks at Home
Stephen Foster

Verse 1
Way down upon the Swanee River,
Far, far away,
There's where my heart is turning ever,
There's where the old folks stay.
All up and down the whole creation,
Sadly I roam,
Still longing for the old plantation,
And for the Old folks at home
Verse 2
All 'round the little farm I wandered
When I was young,
Then many happy days I squandered,
Many the songs I sung,
When I was playing with my brother
Happy was I.
Oh! take me to my kind old mother,
There let me live and die
Verse 3
One little hut among the bushes,
One that I love,
Still sadly to my mem'ry rushes,
No matter where I rove.
When will I see the bees a-humming
All 'round the comb?
When Will I hear the banjo strumming
Down in my good old home?
 
Chorus
All the world is sad and dreary
Ev'rywhere I roam,
Oh, darkies how my heart gorws weary,
Far from the old folks at home.

Oh ! Susanna (1848)
Stephen Foster
Listen

Verse 1
I come from Alabama with a banjo on my knee;
I'm goin' to Lousiana my true love for to see.
It rained all night the day I left,
The weather it was dry;
The sun so hot I froze to death,
Susanna don't you cry.

Chorus
Oh! Susana, don't you cry for me;
I come from Alabama with my banjo on my knee.

Verse 2
I had a dream the other night,
When everything was still;
I thought I saw Susanna dear,
A-comin' down the hill.
The buckwheat cake was in her mouth.
The tear was in her eye,
Said I, I'm coming from the south,
Susanna don't you cry.

Verse 3
I soon will be in New Orleans,
And then I'll look all 'round,
And when I find Susanna,
I'll fall upon the ground.
But if I do not find her,
This darkey'll surely die,
And when I'm dead and buried,
Susanna don't you cry.

My Old Kentucky Home (1852)
Stephen Foster
Listen

Verse 1
The sun shines bright in the old Kentucky home,
'Tis summer, the darkes are gay;
The corn top's ripe and the meadow's in the bloom,
While the birds make music all the day
The young folks roll on the little cabin floor,
All merry, all happy, and bright;
By'n' by hard times comes a-knocking at the door,
Then my old Kentucky home good night!
Verse 2
Theyt hunt no more for the 'possum & the 'coon
On the meadow, the hill, & the shore;
They sing no more by the glimmer of the moon,
On the bench by the old cabin door.
The day goes by like a shadow o'er the heart,
With sorrow where all was delight,
The time has come when the darkes have to part,
Then, my old Kentucky home, good night!

Verse 3
The head must bow & the back will have to bend,
Wherever the darky may go;
A few more days & the trouble all will end,
In the fields where the sugar canes grow;
A few more days for to tote the weary load,
No matter, 'twill never be light,
A few more days till we totter on the road,
Then, my old Kentucky home, good night!
 

Chorus
Weep no more my lady,
Oh ! weep no more today !
We will sing one song for the old Kentucky home,
For the old Kentucky home far away.

Jeanie with the Light Brown Hair (1854)
Stephen Foster

Verse 1
I dream of Jeanie with the light brown hair,
Borne, like a vapor on the summer air;
I see her tripping where the bright streams play,
Happy as the daisies that dance on her way.
Many were the wild notes her merry voice would pour
Many were the blithe birds that warbled them o'er;
Verse 2
I long for Jeannie with the day dawn smile,
Radiant in gladness, war with winning guile;
I hear her melodies, like joys gone by,
Sighing 'round my heart o'er the fond hopes that die:
Sighing like the night wind & sobbing like the rain,
Wailing for the lost one that comes not again:
Oh! I long for Jeanie & my heart bows low,
Never more to find her where the bright waters flow
Verse 3
I sigh for Jeanie, but her light form strayed
Far from the fond hearts 'round her native glade;
Her smiles have vanished & her sweet songs flown,
Flitting like the dreams that have cheered us & gone
Now the nodding wild flow'rs may wither on the shore
While her gentle fingers will cull them no more:
Oh! I sigh for Jeanie with the light brown hair,
Floating, like a vapor, on the soft summer air.
 

Chorus
Oh ! I dream of Jeanie with the light brown hair,
Floating like a vapor on the soft summer air.

 

Beautiful Dreamer (1864)
Stephen Foster
Listen

Verse 1
Beautiful dreamer, wake unto me,
Starlight & dewdrops are waiting for thee.
Sounds of the rude world heard in the day,
Lull'd by the moonlight have all pass'd away.
Beautiful dreamer, queen of my song,
List while I woo thee with soft melody.
Gone are the cares of life's busy throng,
Beautiful dreamer awake unto me!
Beautiful dreamer awake unto me!
Verse 2
Beautiful dreamer, out on the sea,
Mermaids are chanting the wild lorelie;
Over the streamlet vapors are borne,
Waiting to fade at the bright coming morn.
Beautiful dreamer, beam in my heart,
E'en as the morn on the streamlet & sea;
Then will all clouds of sorrow depart,
Beautiful dreamer awake unto me!
Beautiful dreamer awake unto me!

Sweet Genevieve (1869)*
*George Cooper, close friend and collaborator of Stephen Foster, wrote this song

Verse 1
O, Genevieve, I'd give the world
To live again the lovely past!
The rose of youth was dew impearled;
But now it withers in the blast.
I see thy face in ev'ry dream,
My waking thoughts are full of thee;
Thy glance is in the stary beam
Tat falls along the summer sea.
Verse 2
Fair Genevieve, my early love,
The years but make thee dearer far!
My heart shall never, never rove,
Thou art my only guiding star.
For me the past has no regret
Whate'er the years may bring to me;
I bless the hour when first we met,
The hour that gave me love & thee

Chorus
O, Genevieve, sweet Genevieve,
The days may come, the days may go,
But still the hands of mem'ry weave
The blissful dreams of long ago.

 

Man On the Flying Trapeze (1868)
George Leybourne

Verse 1
Oh, once I was happy, but now I'm forlorn,
   like an old coat that is tattered and torn.
I'm left in this wide world to weep and to mourn,
   betrayed by a maid in her teens.
Now this girl that I loved, she was handome,
   and I tried all I knew her to please.
But I never could please her one quarter so well,
   as that man on the flying trapeze.

Chorus
Oh !  He flies through the air with the greatest of ease,
   this daring young man on the flying trapeze.
His movements are graceful, all girls he does please,
   and my love he has purloined away.

Verse 2
Now the young man by name was Senor Boni Slang,
Tall, big and handsome, as well made as Chang,
Where'er he appeared, how the hall loudly rang,
With ovations from all people there.
He'd smile from the bar on the people below
And one night he smiled on my love,
She winked back at him, and she shoulted, "Bravo!"
AS he hung by his nove from above.

Verse 3
Her father and mother were both on my side,
And tried very hard to make her my bride,
Her father, he sighed, and her mother, she cried
To see her throw herself away.
'Twas all no avail, she went there every night
And threw her bouquets on the stage
Which caused him to meet her — how he ran me down,
To tell it would take a whole page.

Verse 4
One night I as usual went out to her home,
And found there her mother and father alone.
I asked for my love, and soon 'twas made known,
To my horror, that she'd run away.
She packed up her boxes and eloped in the night,
With him with the greastest of ease.
From two stories high he had lowered her down
To the ground on his flying trapeze.

Verse 5
Some months after that I went into a hall;
To my surprise I found there on the wall
A bill in red letters which did my heart gall,
That she was appearing with him.
He'd taught her gymnastics, and dressed her in tights
To help him live at his ease.
He'd made her assume a masculine name,
And now she goes on the trapeze.

Final Chorus
Oh !  She flies through the air with the greatest of ease,
   You'd think her a man on the flying trapeze.
She does all the work while he takes his ease,
   And that's what's becomew of my love.

Ulysses S. Grant
18th President
1869-1872 1st Term
1873-1877 2nd Term

Grandfather's Clock (1876)
Henry C. Work
 

Grandfather's Clock (1876)
Henry C. Work
Listen

Verse 1
My grandfather's clock was too large for the shelf,
So it stood ninety years on the floor;
It was taller by half than the old man himself,
Though it weight not a penny weight more.
It was bought on the morn of the day that he was born,
And was always his treasure and pride;
But it stopp'd short, never to go again, when the old man died.

Chorus
Ninety years without slumbering, tick, tock, tick, tock,
His life seconds numbering, tick, tock, tick, tock,
It stopp'd short, never to go again, when the old man died.

Verse 2
In watching its pendulum swing to and fro,
Many hours had he spent while a boy;
And in childhood and manhood the clock seemed to know,
And to share both his grief and his joy.
For it struck twenty-four when he entered the door,
With a blooming and beautiful bride.
But it stopp'd short, never to go again, when the old man died.

Verse 3
My grandfather said, that of those he could hire,
Not a servant so faithful he found;
For it wasted no time, and had but one desire,
At the close of each week to be wound.
And it kept in its place, not a frown upon its face,
And its hands never hung by its side;
But it stopp'd short, never to go again, when the old man died.

Verse 4
It ran an alarm in the dead of the night,
An alarm that for years had been dumb;
And we knew that his spirit was pluming its flight,
That his hour of departure and come.
Still the clock kept the time, with a soft and muffled chime,
As we silently stood by his side;
But it stopp'd short, never to go again, when the old man died.

 

Rutherford B. Hayes
19th President
1877-1881

Baby Mine (1878)
Charles Mackey
 

Baby Mine (1878)
Charles Mackey

Verse 1
I've a letter from thy sire, Baby mine, Baby mine;
I could read and never tire, Baby mine, Baby mine;
He is sailing o'er the sea, He is coming home to me,
He is coming back to thee !  Baby mine, Baby mine;
He is coming back to thee !  Baby mine.

Verse 2
Oh, I long to see his face, Baby mine, Baby mine;
In his old accustom'd place, Baby mine, Baby mine;
Like the rose of May in blom, like a star amid the gloom,
Like the sunshine in the room, Baby mine, Baby mine;
Like the sunshine in the room, Baby mine !

Verse 3
I'm so glad, I cannot sleep, Baby mine, Baby mine;
I'm so happy, I could weep, Baby mine, Baby mine;
He is sailing o'er the sea, he is coming home to me,
He is coming back to thee !  Baby mine, Baby mine;
He is coming back to thee ! Baby mine!

Chester A. Arthur
21st President
1881-1885

Clementine (1880s)
Percy Montross

Love's Old Sweet Song (1884)
G. Clifton Bingham

While Strolling Through the Park (1884) Ed Haley 

Flowers that Bloom in the Spring (1885) from Gilbert and Sullivan's The Mikado

Clementine (1880s)
Percy Montross
Listen

Verse 1
In a cavern in a canyon,
Excavating for a mine,
Dwelt a miner forty-niner,
And his daughter Clementine.
Verse 3
Drove she ducklings to the water,
Ev'ry morning just at nine,
Hit her foot against a splinter,
Fell into the foaming brine.

Chorus
Oh my darling, oh my darling,
Oh my darling Clementine!
Thou art lost and gone forever,
Dreadful sorry, Clementine.

Verse 4
Ruby lips above the water,
Blowing bubbles soft and fine,
But, alas, I was no swimmer,
So I lost my Clementine

Verse 2
Light she was and like a fairy,
And her shoes were number nine,
Herring boxes without topses,
Sandles were for Clementine

Verse 5
How I missed her!  How Imissed her,
How I missed my Clementine,
But I kissed her little sister,
I forgot my Clementine.

Love's Old Sweet Song (1884)
G. Clifton Bingham

Verse 1
Once in the dear dead days beyond recall,
When on the world the mists began to fall,
OUt of the dreams that rose in happy throng,
Low to our hearts love sang an old sweet song.
And in the dusk where fell the firelight gleam,
Softly it wove itself into our dream.

Refrain
Just a song at twilight, when the lights are low,
And the flick'ring shadows softly come and go.
Tho the heart be weary, sad the day and long,
Still to us at twilight comes love's old song,
Comes love's old sweet song

Verse 2
Even today we hear love's song of yore,
Deep in our hearts it dwells for evermore.
Footsteps may falter, weary grow the way,
Still we can hear it at the close of day.
So till the end, when life's dim shadows fall,
Love will be found the sweetest song of all.

Refrain

While Strolling Through the Park (1884)
Ed Haley

While strolling through the park one day,
In the merry month of May,
I was taken by surprise by a pair of roguish eyes,
In a moment my poor heart was stole away.
A smile was all she gave to me.
Of course, it made me happy as can be.
Ah! I immediately raised my hat,
And made a polite remark,
I never shall forget the lovely afternoon
I met her at the fountain in the park.

Flowers that Bloom in the Spring (1885)
from Gilbert and Sullivan's The Mikado

Nanki-Poo:
The flowers that bloom in the spring,    Tra-la
Breathe promise of merry sunshine,
As we merrily dance and we sing,
   Tra-la
We welcome the hope that they bring,
   Tra-la
Of a summer of roses and wine,
Of a summer of roses and wine.
And that's what we mean when
   say that a thing
Is welcome as flowers that bloom
   in the spring.
  Tra-la-la-la-la, Tra-la-la-la-la,
The flowers that bloom in the spring.
Tra-la-la-la-la, Tra-la-la-la-la
Tra-la-la-la-la.
Ko-Ko:
The flowers that bloom in the spring,
  Tra-la
Have nothing to do with the case.
I've got to take under my wing,
   Tra-la
A most unattactive old thing,
  Tra-la
With a caricature of a face,
With a caricature of a face;
And that's what I mean when I say
   or I sing:
"Oh, bother the flowers that bloom
   in the spring."
Tra-la-la-la-la, Tra-la-la-la-la
"Oh bother the flowers of spring!"
Tra-la-la-la-la,Tra-la-la-la-la,
   Tra-la-la-la-la

 

Benjamin Harrison
23rd President
1889-1893

Oh Promise Me (1889)
Clement Scott

Red River Valley (1890s)
Cowboy Song

Ta-Ra-Ra-Boom-Der-E (1891)
Henry J. Sayers

After the Ball (1892)
Charles K. Harris

Bicycle Built for Two (1892)
Harry Darce
 
 

Oh Promise Me (1889)
Clement Scott

Verse 1
Oh promise me, that someday you and I
Will take our love togeter to some sky,
Where we can be alone and faith renew,
And find the hollows where those flowers grew;
Those first sweet violets of early spring,
Which come in whispers, thrill su both, and sing
Of love unspeakable that is to be
Oh promise me!  Oh promise me!
Verse 2
Oh promise me that you will take my hand,
The most unworthy in this lonely land,
And let me sit beside you, in your eyes
Seeing the vision of our paradise;
Hearing God's message while the organ rolls
Its mighty music to our very souls;
No love less perfect than a life with tee,
Oh promise me! oh promise me!

Red River Valley (1890s)
Cowboy Song
Listen

Verse 1
From this valley they say you are going;
We will miss your bright eyes and sweet smile,
For they say you are taking the sunshine,
Which has brightened our pathway awhile.

Chorus
Come and sit by my side if you love me,
do not hasten to bid me adieu,
But remember the Red River Valley
And the girl that has loved you so true.

Verse 2
Won't you think of the valley you're leaving?
Oh how lonely, how sad it will be,
Oh think of the fond heart you're breaking,
And the grief you are causing me.

Verse 3
I have promised you, darling, that never
Will a word from my lips cause you pain;
And my life, it will be yours forever
If you only will love me again.

Ta-Ra-Ra-Boom-Der-E (1891)
Henry J. Sayers
Listen

Verse 1
A sweet Tuxedo girl you see,
Queen of swell society,
Fond of fun as fond can be,
When it's on the strict Q.T.
I'm not too young,
I'm not too old,
Not too timid, not to bold,
Jud the kind you'd like to hold,
Just the kind for sport, I'm told.
Verse 2
I'm a blusing bud of innocence,
Papa says at big expense,
Old maid say I have no sense,
Boys delcare I'm just immense.
Before my song I do conclude,
I want it strictly understood,
Tho' fond of fun, I'm never rude,
Tho' not too bad,
I'm not too good.

Chorus
Ta-ra-ra Boom-der-e,Ta-ra-ra Boom-der-e,
Ta-ra-ra Boom-der-e, Ta-ra-ra Boom-der-e,
Ta-ra-ra Boom-der-e, Ta-ra-ra Boom-der-e,
Ta-ra-ra Boom-der-e, Ta-ra-ra Boom-der-e,

After the Ball (1892)
Charles K. Harris

Verse 1
A little maiden climbed an old man's knee
Begged for a story — "Do Uncle please."
Why are you single; why live alone?
Have you no babies; have you no home?
"I had a sweetheart, years, years ago;
Where she is now pet, you will soon know
List to the story, I'll tell it all,
I believed her faithless after the ball.

Chorus:
After the ball is over, after the break of morn —
After the dancers' leaving; after the stars are gone;
Many a heart is aching, if you could read them all;
Many the hopes that have vanished after the ball.

Verse 2
Bright lights were flashing in the grand ballroom,
Softly the music, playing sweet tunes
There came my sweetheart, my love, my own —
'I wish some water; leave me alone'
When I returned dear there stood a man,
Kissing my sweetheart as lovers can.
Down fell the glass pet, broken, that's all,
Just as my heart was after the ball,

Chorus

Verse 3
Long years have passed child, I've never wed,
True to my lost love, though she is dead.
She tried to tell me, tried to explain;
I would not listen, pleadings were vain,
One day a letter came from that man,
He was her brother — the letter ran.
That's why I'm lonely, no home at all;
I broker her heart pet, after the ball.

Chorus

Bicycle Built for Two (1892)
Harry Darce
Listen

Verse 1
There is a flower within my heart,     Daisy, Daisy !
Planted one day by a glancing dart,
Planted by Daisy Bell!
Whether she loves me or loves me not,
Sometimes it's hard to tell;
Yet I am longing to share the lot,
Of beautiful Daisy Bell!
Verse 2
We will go "tandem" as man and wife,
  Daisy, Daisy!
"Ped'ling" away down the road of life,
I and my daisy Bell!
When the road's dark we can both despise
P'licemen and "lamps" as well;
There are bright lights in the dazzling eyes
Of beautiful Daisy Bell!

Chorus
Daisy, Daisy, Give me your answer, do!
I'm half crazy,
All for the love of you !
It won't be a stylish marriage,
I can't afford a carriage,
But you'll look sweet,
Upon the seat of a bicycle built for two!
 

Verse 3
I will stand by you in "wheel" or woe,
   Daisy, Daisy!
You'll be the beel(3) which I'll ring, you know!
Sweet little Daisy Bell!
You'll take the "lead" in each "trip" we take,
Then, if I don't do well,
I will permit you to use the brake,
My beautiful Daisy Bell!


William McKinley
25th President
1897-1900 1st term
1901 2nd term cut short

Grover Cleveland
24th President
1893-1897 (2nd term)

Sidewalks of New York (1894)
Charles B. Lawlor and James W. Blake

Verse 1
Down in front of Casey's,
Old bbrown wooden stoop,
On a summer's evening,
We formed a merry group;
Boys and girls together,
We would sing and walts,
While Tony played the organ
On the sidewalks of New York.
Verse 2
That's where Johnny Casey,
And little Jimmy Crowe,
With Jakey Krause the baker,
Who always had the dough,
Pretty Nellie Shannon,
With a dude as light as cork,
First picked up the waltz step
On the sidewalks of New York.

Chorus
East Side, West side,
All around the town,
The tots play "ring a rosie,"
London Bridge is falling down;"
Boys and girls together,
Me and Mamie O'Rorke,
We trip the light fantastic,
On the sidewalks of New York.

Verse 3
Things have changed since those times,
Some are up in "G,"
Others, they are wand'rers,
but they all feel just like me;
They'd part with all they've got,
Could they but once more walk,
With their best girl and have a twirl
On the sidewalks of New York.

 

At a Georgia Camp Meeting (1897)
Kerry Mills

Verse 1
A camp meeting took place, in a wide open space,
Way down in Georgia.
There were folks large and small, lanky, lean, fat and tall,
   at this great Georgia camp meeting.
When church was out, how the sisters did shout, they were so happy.
But the young folks were tired and wished to be inspired, and hired a big brass band.

Chorus
When the big brass band began to play
Pretty music so gay, hats were then thrown away.
Thought them foolish people their necks would break,
When they quit their laughting and talking and walking for a big choc'late cake.

Verse 2
The old sisters raised sand, when they first heard the band;
Way down in Georgia.
The preacher did glare and the deacons did stare,
At the young people prancing.
The band played so sweet that nobody could eat,
'Twas so entrancing
So the church folks agreed it was not a sinful deed,
And they joined in with the rest.

Grover Cleveland
24th President
1893-1897 (2nd term)

The Band Played On (1895)
John F. Palmer
 
   

The Band Played On (1895)
John F. Palmer


Matt Casey formed a social club that beat the town for style,
And hired for a meeting place a hall —
When pay day came around each week they greased the floor with wax.
And danced with noise and vigor at the ball,
Each Saturday you'd see them dressed up in Sunday clothes,
Each lad would have his sweetheart by his side.
When Casey led the first grand march they all would fall in line,
Behind the man who was their joy and pride, for —

Chorus
Casey would waltz with a strawberry blone,
And the Band played on,
He'd glide cross the floor with the girl he ador'd, and the Band played on,
But his brain was so loaded it nearly exploded,
The poor girl would shake with alarm.
He'd ne'er leave the girl with the strawberry curls,
And the Band played on.

William McKinley
25th President
1897-1900 1st term
1901 2nd term cut short

Hello ! Ma Baby (1899)
Joseph E. Howard and Ida Emerson

There'll Be a Hot Time (Spanish American War Song)
Joe Hayden

A Bird in a Gilded Cage (1900)
Arthur J. Lamb

Boll Weevil Song (around 1900s)

Hello ! Ma Baby (1899)
Joseph E. Howard and Ida Emerson

Verse 1
I'se got a little babby, but she's out of sight,
I talk to her across the telephone;
I'se never seen my honey but she's mine, all right;
So take my tip, an' leave this gal alone
Ev'ry single morning, you will hear me yell,
"Hey Central ! fix me up along the line."
He connects me with ma honey, then I rings the bell,
And this is what I say to baby mine —

Chorus
"Hello ! ma baby, Hello! my honey, Hello ! my ragtime gal,
Send me a kiss by wire,
Baby my heart's on fire!
If you refuse me,
Honey, You'll lose me,
Then youl'bee left alone;
oh, baby, telephone and tell me I'se your own

Verse 2
This morning through the 'phone she said her name was Bess,
And now I kind of know where I am at;
I'm satisfied because I've got my babe's address,
Here pasted in the lining of my hat.
I am mighty scared 'cause if the wires get crossed
'Twill separate me from ma baby mine,
Then some other man will win her and my game is lost,
And so each day I shout along the line —

Chorus

There'll Be a Hot Time (Spanish American War Song)
Joe Hayden
Note:  The Rough Riders sang this song so much,
the Spanish thought it was the USA national anthem

Verse 1
Come along, get you ready, wear your bran', bran' new gown,
For there's gwine to be a meeting in that good, good old town,
Where you knowded ev'rybody and they all knowded you,
And you've got a rabbit's foot to keep a way the hoo-doo.
When you hear that the preaching does begin,
Bend down low for to drive away your sin.
And you gets religion, you want to shout and sing,
There'll be a hot time in the old town tonight,
My baby!

Chorus
When you hear them a bells go ding, ling, ling,
All join 'round and sweetly you must sing;
And when the verse am through,
In the chorus all join in,
There'll be a hot time in the old town tonight.

Verse 2
There'll be girls for ev'rybody in that good, good old town,
For there's Miss Consola Davis an' there's Miss Gondolia Brown,
And there's Miss Johanna Beasly, she am dressed all in red,
I just hugged her and I kissed her and to me then she said:
"Please, oh, please, oh, do not let me fall.
You're all mine and I love you best of all;
And you must be my man or I'll hve no man at all.
There'll be a hot time in the old town tonight,
My baby!"

 

A Bird in a Gilded Cage (1900)
Arthur J. Lamb

Verse 1
The ballroom was filled with fashions throng,
It shone with a thousand lightss,
And there was a woman who passed along,
The fairest of all the sights,
A girl to her lover then softly sighed,
There's riches at her command;
But she married for wealth, not for love he cried,
Thought she lives in a mansion grand.

Chorus
She's only a bird in a gilded cage,
A beautiful sight to see,
You may think she's happy and free from care,
She's not, thought she seems to be,
'Tis sad when you think of her wasted life,
For youth cannot mate with age,
And her beauty was sold,
For an old man's gold,
She's a bird in a gilded cage.

Verse 2
I stood in a churchyard just at eve',
When sunset adorned the west,
And looked at the people who'd come to grieve,
For loved ones now laid at rest,
A tall marble monument marked the grave.
Of one who'd been fashion's queen,
And I thought she is happier here at rest,
Then to have people say when ween —

Chorus

Boll Weevil Song (around 1900s)

Verse 1
Oh, the boll weevil is a little black bug
     come from Mexico, they say.
Come all the way to Texas,
     just a-lookin' for a place to stay.
Just a-lookin' for a home, Just a lookin' for a home.
Just a-lookin' for a home, Just a lookin' for a home.
Verse 6
The merchant got half the cotton,
The boll weevil got the rest.
Don't leave the farmer's wife
But one old cotton dress —
And it's full of holes, and it's full of holes.
And it's full of holes, and it's full of holes.

Verse 2
Now the first time I seen the boll weevil,
He was sitting on the square.
The next time I seen the boll weevil,
He had all his family there —
Just a-lookin' for a home, Just a lookin' for a home.
Just a-lookin' for a home, Just a lookin' for a home.

Verse 7
The farmer said to the merchant,
"We're in an awful fix;
The boll weevil ate all the cotton up
And left us only sticks —
We got no home, we got no home.
We got no home, we got no home"

Verse 3
The farmer took the boll weevil,
And he put him in hot sand.
The weevil said, "This is mighty hot,
But I'll stand it like a man —
This'll be my home, this'll be my home.
This'll be my home, this'll be my home.
Verse 8
The farmer said to the merchant,
"We ain't made but one bale,
And before we'll give you that one,
We'll fight and go to jail —
We'll have a home, we'll have a home.
We'll have a home, we'll have a home.

Verse 4
The farmer took the boll weevil,
And he put him in a lump of ice.
The boll weevil said to the farmer,
It'll be my home, it'll be my home.
It'll be my home, it'll be my home.

Verse 9
And if anybody should ask you
Who was it made this song;
It was the farmer man
With all but his blue jeans gone —
A-lookin' for a home, a-lookin' for a home.
A-lookin' for a home, a-lookin' for a home.

Verse 5
The boll weevil said to the farmer,
"you better leave me alone;
I ate up all your cotton,
And I'm starting on your corn —
I'll have a home, I'll have a home.
I'll have a home, I'll have a home.

 

Theodore Roosevelt
26th President
1901-1909

Yale Boola March (1901)
Charles H. Loomis

Because (1902)
Edward Teschemacher

Bill Bailey, Won't You
Please Come Home

(1902) Hughie Cannon

In the Good Old Summertime (1902)
Ren Shields

Under the Bamboo Tree (1903)
Bob Cole

Ida !  Sweet as Apple Cider (1903)
Eddie Leonard

Toyland (1903)
Glen MacDonough

Give My Regards to Broadway (1904) from George M. Cohan's musical Little Johnny Jones

Yankee Doodle Boy (1904)
from George M. Cohan's musical Little Johnny Jones

Meet Me In St. Louis, Louis (1904)
Andrew B. Sterling

Mary's A Grand Old Name (1905)
George M. Cohan

Forty-Five Minutes from Broadway (1905) George M. Cohan

Harrigan
George M. Cohan

My Gal Sal (1905)
Paul Dresser

Wait Till the Sun Shines, Nellie (1905) Andrew B. Sterling

In My Merry Oldsmobile (1905)
Vincent Bryan

In the Shade of the Old Apple Tree (1905) Harry H. Williams

Because You're You (1906)
from Victor Herbert's operetta
The Red Mill

You're a Grand Old Flag (1906)
George M. Cohan

Cuddle Up a Little Closer (1908)
Otto Harbach

Yale Boola March and Two Step (1901)
Charles H. Loomis

Sentimental Yale Boola

Athletic Yale Boola

College Yale Boola

Sentimental Yale Boola


Away, way down on the old Swaunee,
Where the rippling waves are dance to & fro
the soft perfume fom o'er the lea,
Tells where sweet magnolia blossoms grow.
There's where my Adelina dwells,
Mid fair sylvan dells,
She laughts and sings the whole day through,
Boola, Boo, Boola, 'oola, Boola, Boo !

Chorus
Boola, Boola, Boola, Boola,
Boola, Boola, Boola, Boola,
When I meet sweet Adelina,
Then she sings her Boola song.
Adelina, Adelina
I'll be waiting Adelina,
When the silver moon is beaming;
Then I'll meet you, Adeline.

Her long and wavy nut-brown hair,
Is tossing out upon the summer breeze,
Her sparkling eyes are wondrous fair,
Her voice like the music 'mong the trees,
I ask her when she'll be my bride,
Her head she turns aside,
And laughs and sings the whole day through,
Boola, Boo, Boola, 'oola, Boola, Boo

Athletic Yale Boola

Well, here we are; well, here we are !
Just watch us rolling up a score.
We'll leave those fellows behind so far,
They won't want to pay us any more!
We've hope and faith in Eli Yale!
To win we cannot fail!
Well, Boola, Boo, Boola, Boola, Boo
Boola, Boo, 'oola, Boola, Boo

Chorus
Boola, Boola, Boola, Boola,
Boola, Boola, Boola, Boola,
When were through with those poor fellows,
They will holer "Boola, Boo,
Rah, Rah, Rah
IYale, Eli Yale,
Oh, Yake, Eli Yale,
Oh, Yake, Eli Yale,
Oh, Yake, Eli Yale,

Now isn't it a shame, now, isn't it a shame,
To do those fellows up so bad?
We'e done it before, we can do it once more,
Theough they'll feel very very sad.
We'll roll up the score so very high,
That you will hear them sigh,
Boola, Boola, Boo, Boola, Boola, Boo
Boola, Boola, Boo, Boola, Boola, Boo

College Yale Boola

Bright college years with pleasure rife,
The shortest gladdest years of life,
How swiftly are ye gliding by,
Oh why doth time so quickly fly?
The seasons come, the seasons go,
The earth is green, or white with snow,
But time and change shall nought avail
To break the friendships formed at Yale!

We all must leave this college home,
About the stormy world to roam,
But though the mighty ocean's tide,
Should us from dear old Yale divide,
As round the oak the ivy twines,
The clinging tendrils of its vines,
So are our hearts close bound to Yale,
By ties of love that ne'er shall fail.

In after years should troubles rise,
To cloud the blue of sunny skies,
How bright will seem thro' memory's haze,
The happy, golden by gone days,
Oh, let us strive that ever we
May let these word our watch cry be,
Where'er upon life's sea we sail,
"For God, for Country and for Yale!"

 

Because (1902)
Edward Teschemacher

Because you come to me with naught save love,
And hold my hand and lift mine eyes above,
A wider world of hope and joy I see,
Because you come to me.

Because you speak to me in accents sweet,
I find the roses waking 'round my feet,
And I am led through tears and joy to thee,
Because you speak to me.

Because God made thee mine I'll cherish thee
Through light and darkness through all time to be,
And pray His love may make our love divine,
Because God made thee mine.

Bill Bailey, Won't You Please Come Home (1902)
Hughie Cannon

Verse 1
One one summer day,
Sun was shining fine,
The lady love of old Bill Bailey was hanging clothes on the line
In her back yard and weeping hard.

Chorus
Won't you come home, Bill Bailey, won't you come home?
She moans de whole day long;
I'll do de cooking, darling,
I'll pay de rent; I knows I've done you wrong;
'Member dat rainy eve dat I drove you out,
Wid nothing but a fine tooth come?
I knows I'se to blame; well, ain't dat a shame?
Bill Bailey, won't you please come home?

Verse 2
She married a B and O brakeman,
   that took and throw'd her down,
Bellering like a prunefed calf,
   with a big gang haning round;
And to that crowd she yell'd out loud —

Chorus

In the Good Old Summertime (1902)
Ren Shields

Verse 1
There's a time in each year that we always hold dear,
Good old summer time.
With the birds and the trees and sweet scented breezes,
Good old summer time.
When your day's work is over then you are in clover,
   and life is one beautiful rhyme:
No trouble annoying each one is enjoying
The good old summer time.

Chorus
In the good old summer time,
In the good old summer time,
Strolling thro' the shady lanes with your baby mine.
You hold her hand and she holds yours,
And that's a very good sign
That she's your tootsey wootsey in the good old summer time.

Verse 2
To swim in the pool you'd play "hooky" from school,
Good old summer time.
You'd play "ring aroise" with jim, Kate and Josie,
Good old summer time.
Those days full of pleasure we now fondly treasure,
   when we never thought it a crime
To go stealing cherries, with face brown as berries,
Good old summer time.

Under the Bamboo Tree (1903)
Bob Cole

Verse 1
Down in the jungle lived a maid,
Of royal blood tho' dusky shade,
A marked impression once she made
Upon a Zulu from Matabooloo;
And every morning he would be
Down underneath a bamboo tree,
Awaiting there his love to see
And then to her he'd sing:
Verse 2
This little story, strange but true,
Is often told in Mataboo,
Of how this Zulu tried to woo
His jungle lady in tropics shady.
Although the scene was miles away,
Right here at home, I dare to say,
You'll hear some Zulu ev'ry day
Gush out this soft refrain:
Chorus
If you lak-a-me, lak I lak-a-you,
And we lak-a-both the same,
I lak-a say, this very day,
I lak-a change your name;
'Cause I love-a-you, and
Love-a-you true, and if you-alove-a-me,
One live as two,
Two live as one,
under the bamboo tree.

Ida !  Sweet as Apple Cider (1903)
Eddie Leonard

Verse 1
In the region where the roses always bloom,
Breathing out upon the air their sweet perfume,
Lives a dusky maid I long to call my own,
For, I know my love for her will never die;
When the sun am sinkin' in dat golden West,
Little Robin Red Breast gone to seek their nests,
Then I sneak down to dat place I love the best,
Ev'ry ev'ning there alone I sigh.

Chorus
Ida ! sweet as apple cider,
Sweeter than all I know,
Come out! in the silv'ry moonlight,
of love we'll whisper, so soft and low!
Seems tho' can't live without you,
Listen Oh! Honey do!
Ida !  I idolize yer,
I love you Ida, deed I do.

Verse 2
When the moon comes stealing up behind the hill,
Ev'rything around me seems so calm and still,
Save the gentle calling of the Whippoor Will,
Then I long to hold her little hand in mine;
Thro' the trees the winds are sighing soft and low,
Seem to come and whisper that your love is true,
Come and be my own now, Sweetheart do !  oh do !
Then my life will seem almost divine.

Chorus

Toyland (1903)
Glen MacDonough

Verse 1
When you've grown up, my dears,
And are as old as I
You'll often ponder on the years
That roll so swiftly by, my dears,
That roll so swiftly by;
And of the many lands
You will have journey through
You'll oft recall the best of all,
The land your childhood knew !
Your childhood knew
Refrain
Toyland !  Toylandd !
Little girl and boy land,
While you dwell within it
You are ever happy then.
Childhood's joy land,
Mystic merry toy land!
Once you pass its borders,
You can ne'er return again.

 

Give My Regards to Broadway (1904)
from George M. Cohan's musical Little Johnny Jones

Verse 1
Did you ever see two Yankees part up on a foreign shore,
When the good ship's just about to start for old New York once more?
With tear dimmed eye, they say good bye, there friends, without a doubt;
When the man on the pier shouts "Let them clear", as the ship strikes out.

Chorus
Give my regards to Broadway,
Remember me to Herald Square;
Tell all the gang at Forty-Second Street that I will soon be there.
Whisper of how I'm yearning to mingle with the old time throng;
Give my regards to old Broadway and say that I'll be there, e'er long.

Verse 2
Say hellow to dear old Coney Isle, if there you chance to be,
When you're at the Waldorf, have a smile and charge it up to me.
Mention my name ev'ry place you go, as 'round the town you roam;
Wish you'd call on my gal, now remember, old pal,
When you get back home.

Chorus

Yankee Doodle Boy (1904)
from George M. Cohan's musical Little Johnny Jones
Sing to Tune

Verse 1
I'm the kid that's all the candy,
I'm a Yankee Doodle Dandy,
I'm glad I am, So's Uncle Sam.
I'm a real live Yankee Doodle,
Made my name and fame and boodle
Just like Mister doodle did, by riding on a pony.
I love to listen to the Dixie strain,
"I long to see the girl I left behind me";
And that ain't a josh,
She's a Yankee, by gosh,
Oh, say can you see
Anything about a Yankee that's a phony?
Verse 2
Father's name was Hezekiah,
Mother's name was Ann Maria,
Yanks through and through,
Red, White and Blue
Father was so Yankee-hearted,
When the Spanish war was started,
He slipped on his uniform and hopped up on a pony.
My mother's mother was a Yankee true,
My father's father was a Yankee too;
And that's going some,
For the Yankees, by gum,
Oh, say can you see
Anything about my pedigree that's phony?

Chorus
I'm a Yankee Doodle Dandy,
A Yankee Doodle, do or die;
A real live nephew of my Uncle Sam's,
Born on the Fourth of July.
I've got a Yankee Doodle sweetheart,
She's my Yankee Doodle joy.
Yankee Doodle came to London
Just to ride the ponies;
I am the Yankee Doodle Boy!

Meet Me In St. Louis, Louis (1904)
Andrew B. Sterling

Verse 1
When Louis came home to the flat,
He hung up his coat and his hat,
He gazed all around, but no wifey he found,
so he said "where can Flossie be at?"
A note on the table he spied,
He read it just once, then he cried.
It ran, "LOuis dear, it's too slow for me here,
So I think I will go for a ride."
Verse 2
The dresses that hung in the all,
Were gone, she had taken them all;
She took all his rings & the rest of his things;
The picture he missed from the wall.
"What ! moving !" the janitor said,
"Your rent is paid three months ahead."
"What good is the flat?" said the poor Louis, "Read that."
And the janitor smiled as he read.
Chorus
Meet me in St. Louis, Louis,
Meet me at the fair,
don't tell me the lights are shining anyplace but there;
We will dance the Hoochee Koochee,
I will be your tootsie wootsie;
If you will meet me in St. Louis, Louis,
Meet me at the fair.

 

Mary's A Grand Old Name (1905)
George M. Cohan

Verse 1
My mother's name was Mary,
   she was so good and ture;
Because her name was Mary,
   she called me Mary, too.
She wasn't gay or airy,
   but plain as she could be;
I hate to meet a fairy
   who calls herself Marie.
Verse 2
Now, when her name is Mary,
   there is no falseness there;
When to Marie she'll vary,
   she'll surely bleach her hair.
Though Mary's ordinary,
Marie is fair to see;
Don't ever fear sweet Mary,
Beware of sweet Marie!
Chorus
For it is Mary, Mary, plain as any name can be;
But with propriety, society will say Marie;
But it was Mary, Mary, long before the fashions came,
And there is something there that sounds so square,
It's a grand old name.

Forty-Five Minutes from Broadway (1905)
George M. Cohan

Verse 1
The West, so they say, is the home of the jay,
And Missouri's the state that can grind them.
This may all be, but just take it from me,
You don't have to go out West to find them.
If you want to see the real jay delegation,
The place where the real rubens dwell,
Just hop on a train at the Grand Central Station,
Get off when they shout "New Rochelle."

Verse 1 Chorus
Only forty-five minutes from Broadway, think of the changes it brings;
For the short time it takes, what a difference it makes
In the ways of the people and things.
Oh ! what a fine bunch of rubens,
Oh ! what a jay atmosphere;
They have whiskers like hay, and imagine Broadway only forty-five minutes from here

Verse 2
When the bunco men hear that their game is so near,
They'll be swarming here thicker than bees are;
In Barnum's best days, why he never saw jays,
That were easier to get to than these are.
You tell them old jokes and they laugh till they sicken;
There's giggles and grins here to let.
I told them that one about "Why does a chicken"
The rubens are all laughing yet.

Verse 2 Chorus
Only forty-five minutes from Broadway, not a cafe in the town;
Oh ! the place is a bird, no one here ever heard
Of Delmonico, Rector or Browne
With a ten dollar bill you're a spendthrift;
If you open a bottle of beer
You're a sport so they say, and imagine
Broadway only forty-five minutes from here

Harrigan
George M. Cohan
Listen

Verse 1:
Who is the man who will spend or will even lend?
Harrigan, That's Me!
Who is your friend when you find that you need a friend?
Harrigan, That's Me!
For I'm just as proud of my name you see,
As an Emperor, Czar or a King, could be.
Who is the man helps a man every time he can?
Harrigan, That's Me!

Chorus:
H - A - double R - I - G - A - N spells Harrigan
Proud of all the Irish blood that's in me; Divil a man can say a word agin me.
H - A - double R - I - G - A - N, you see,
Is a name that a shame never has been connected with, Harrigan, That's me!

Verse 2: Who is the man never stood for a gad about?
Harrigan, That's Me!
Who is the man that the town's simply mad about?
Harrigan, That's Me!
The ladies and babies are fond of me,
I'm fond of them, too, in return, you see.
Who is the gent that's deserving a monument?
Harrigan, That's Me!

Chorus:
H - A - double R - I - G - A - N spells Harrigan
Proud of all the Irish blood that's in me; Divil a man can say a word agin me.
H - A - double R - I - G - A - N, you see,
Is a name that a shame never has been connected with, Harrigan, That's me!

My Gal Sal (1905)
Paul Dresser

Verse 1
Ev'rything is over and I'm feeling bad,
Ilost the best pal that I ever had;
'Tis but a fortnight since she was here,
Seems like she's gone through her twenty years.
Oh, how I miss her, my old pal,
Oh, how I'd kiss her, my gal Sal;
Face not so handsome, but eyes, don't you know,
That shone just as bright as they did years ago.
Verse 2
Bought her little dainties just afore she died,
Promised she would meet me on the other side.
Told her how I loved her, she said "I know, Jim,
Just do your best, Leave the rest to Him."
Gently I pressed her to my breast,
Soon she would take her long rest.
She looked at me and murmured "Pal",
And softly I whispered "Good bye Sal."

Chorus
They called her frivolous Sal,
A peculiar sort of a gal;
With a heart that was mellow,
An all 'round good fellow was my old pal.
Your troubles, sorrows and care,
She was always willing to share;
A wild sort of devil,
But dead on the level was my gal Sal.

Wait Till the Sun Shines, Nellie (1905)
Andrew B. Sterling

On a Sunday morn, sat a maid forlorn,
With her sweetheart by her side;
Thro' the window pane, she looked at the rain,
"We must stay home, Joe," she cried;
"There's a picnic too, at the Old Point View,
It's ashame it rained today."
Then the boy drew near, Kissed away each tear,
And she heard him softly say:
Chorus
Wait till the sun shines, Nellie,
When the clouds go drifting by,
We will be happy Nellie,
Don't you sigh.
Down lovers' lane we'll wander,
Sweetheart you and I;
So won't you wait till the sun shines, Nellie
Bye and bye.

In My Merry Oldsmobile (1905)
Vincent Bryan

Verse 1
Young Jonnie Steele has an Oldsmobile,
He loves a dear little girl,
She is the queen of his gas machine,
She has his heart in a whirl.
Now, when they go for a spin, you know,
She tries to learn the auto, so
He lets her steer while he gets her ear,
And whispers soft and low.
Verse 2
They love to spark in the dark old park,
As they go flying along,
She says she knows why the motor goes;
The sparker's awfully strong.
Each day they spoon to the engine's tune,
Their honeymoon will happen soon,
He'll win Lucile with his Oldsmobile
And Then he'll fondly croon —
Chorus
Come away with me Lucile
In my merry Oldsmobile,
Down the road of life we'll fly
Automobubbling you and I.
To the church we'll swiftly steal,
Then our wedding bells will peal,
You can go as far as you like with me,
In my merry Oldsmobile.

In the Shade of the Old Apple Tree (1905)
Harry H. Williams

Verse 1
The oriole with joy was sweetly singing,
The little brooke was bab'ling it's tune,
The village bells at noon were gaily ringing
The world seem'd brighter than a harvest moon;
For there within my arms I gently pressed you,
And blushing red, you slowly turned away,
I can't forget the way I once caressed you;
I only pray we'll meet another day.
Verse 2
I've really come a long way from the city,
And though my heart is breaking I'll be brave,
I've brought this bunch of flow'rs I think they're pretty
To place upon a freshly molded grave;
If you will show me, father, where she's lying,
Or if it's far just point it out to me,
Said he "she told us all when she was dying,
To bury her beneath the apple tree.
Chorus
In the shade of the old apple tree,
Where the love in your eyes I could see,
When the voice that I heard, like the song of the bird,
Seem'd to whisper sweet music to me;
I could hear the dull buzz of the bee,
In the blossoms as you said to me,
With a heart that is true, I'll be waiting for you,
In the shade of the old apple tree.

Because You're You (1906)
from Victor Herbert's operetta The Red Mill

Love is a queer little elfin sprinte,
Blest with the deadliest aim!
Shooting his arrows to left and right,
Bagging the rarest game,
Filling our hearts with a glad surprise,
Almost too good to be true!
And still can you tell me why do you love me?
Only because you are you, dear!

Not that you are fair, dear,
Not that I am true,
Not my golden hair, dear,
Not my eyes of blue,
When we ask the reason,
Words are all too few!
So I know I love you, dear,
Because you're you!

You're a Grand Old Flag (1906)
George M. Cohan

Verse 1
There a feeling comes a-stealing & it sets my brain a-reeling,
When I'm list'ning to the music of a military band.
Any tune like "yankee Doodle" simply sets me off my noodle,
It's that patriotic something that no one can understand.

Verse 1 Chorus
Way down South in the land of cotton, melody untiring,
Ain't that inspiring!
Hurrah ! Hurrah ! We'll join the jubilee,
And that's going some for the Yankees by gum!
Red, White and Blue, I am for you,
Honest, you're a grand old flag.

Verse 2
I'm no cranky, hanky panky, I'm a dead square honest Yankee,
And I'm mighty proud of that old flag that flies for Uncle Sam.
Though I don't believe in raving ev'ry time I see it waving,
There's a chill runs up my back that makes me glad I'm what I am.

Verse 2 Chorus
Here's a land with a million soldiers, that's if we should nee 'em,
We'll fight for freedom!
Hurrah ! Hurrah ! For ev'ry Yankee Tar
And Old G. A. R., ev'ry stripe, ev'ry star,
Red, White and Blue,
Hats off to you,
Honest, you're a grand old flag.

Chorus
You're a grand old flag thou' you're torn to a rag,
And forever in peace may you wave.
You're the emblem of the land I love,
The home of the free and the brave.
Ev'ry heart beats true under Red, White and Blue.
Where there's never a boast or brag;
But should auld acquaintance be forgot
Keep your eye on the grand old flag

Cuddle Up a Little Closer, Lovey Mine (1908)
Otto Harbach

Verse 1
On the summer shore, where the breakers roar,
Lovers sat on the glistning sand.
Anad they talked of love, while the moon above,
And the stars seemed to understand.
Then she grew more cold, and he grew more bold,
Till she tho't that they had better go.
But altho' he heard, he not even stirred,
Only murmured in tones soft and low.

Chorus
Cuddle up a little closer, lovey mine,
Cuddle up and be my little clinging vine.
Like to feel your cheek so rosy
Like to make you comfy, cozy,
'Cause I love from head to toesy, lovey mine.

Verse 2
Then she deigned to rest on his manly chest,
Her dear head with its flowing curls,
And she said, "I'd stay, on this lap for aye,
How I envy the capland girls.
For miss esquimaxx, 'md the ice and snow,
Has no steam heat when he comes to call.
Not a single glim, so it's up to him,
To shipser in summer or fall

Chorus

William Howard Taft
27th President
1909-1913

Let Me Call You Sweetheart (1910) Beth Slater Whitson

Alexander’s Ragtime Band (1911)
Irving Berlin

Oh, You Beautiful Doll (1911)
Seymour Brown

Moonlight Bay (1912)
Edward Madden

Row, Row, Row (1912)
William Jerome
 

Let Me Call You Sweetheart (1910)
Beth Slater Whitson


Verse 1
I am dreaming Dear of you, Day by day
Dreaming when the skies are blue, When they're gray;
When the silv'ry moonlight gleams, Still I wander on in dreams,
In a land of love, it seems, Just with you.

Chorus: Let me call you "Sweetheart," I'm in love with you.
Let me hear you whisper that you love me too.
Keep the love-light glowing in your eyes so true.
Let me call you "Sweetheart," I'm in love with you.

Verse 2: Longing for you all the while, More and more;
Longing for the sunny smile, I adore;
Birds are singing far and near, Roses blooming ev'rywhere
You, alone, my heart can cheer; You, just you.

Alexander’s Ragtime Band (1911)
Irving Berlin
Listen


Verse 1
Oh, ma honey, Oh, ma honey, better hurry and let’s meander.
Ain’t you goin’, ain’t you goin’ to the leader man, ragged meter man?
Oh ma honey, Oh ma honey, let me take to Alexander’s
Grand stand, brass band, ain’t you comin’ along.

Chorus 1
Come on and hear, come on and hear Alexander’s ragtime band.
Come on and hear, come on and hear, it’s the best band in the land.
They can play a bugle call like you never heard before,
So natural that you want to go to war;
That’s just the bestest band what am, my honey lamb.
Come on along, come on along, let me take you by the hand,
Up to the man, up to the man, who is the leader of the band.
And if you care to hear the Swanee River played in ragtime,
Come on and hear, come on and hear, Alexander’s ragtime band.

Verse 2
Oh, ma honey, Oh, ma honey, there’s a fiddler with notes that screeches,
Like a chicken, like a chicken, and the clarinet is the leader’s pet.
Come and listen, come and listen, to a classical band what’s peaches,
Come now, somehow, better hurry along.

Chorus 2
Come on and hear, come on and hear Alexander’s ragtime band.
Come on and hear, come on and hear, it’s the best band in the land.
They can play a bugle call like you never heard before,
So natural it will make your spirit soar;
That’s just the bestest band what am, my honey lamb.
Come on along, come on along, let me take you by the hand,
Up to the man, up to the man, who is the leader of the band.
And if you care to hear the Swanee River played in ragtime,
Come on and hear, come on and hear, Alexander’s ragtime band

Oh, You Beautiful Doll (1911)
Seymour Brown


Verse 1
Honey dear, Want you near,
Just turn out the light and then come over here;
Nestle close up to my side,
My heart's a fire, With love's desire.
In my arms, rest complete,
I never thought that life could ever be so sweet,
Till I met you, some time ago,
But now you know I love you so.

Chorus
Oh! you beautiful doll, you great, big beautiful doll!
Let me put my arms about you, I could never live without you;
Oh! you beautiful doll, you great, big beautiful doll!
If you ever leave me how my heart will ache,
I want to hug you but I fear you'd break.
Oh, oh, oh, oh, Oh, you beautiful doll!

Verse 2
Precious prize, Close your eyes,
Now we're goin' to visit lover's paradise;
Press your lips again to mine,
For love is king of ev'ry thing.
Squeeze me, dear, I don't care!
Hug me just as if you were a grizzly bear.
This is how I'll go through life,
No care or strife when you're my wife.

Moonlight Bay (1912)
Edward Madden


Verse 1
Voices hum, crooning over Moonlight Bay,
Banjos strum, tuning while the moon beams play.
All alone, unknown they find me, memories like these remind me
Of the girl I left behind me, down on Moonlight bay.

Chorus
We were sailing along on Moonlight Bay,
We could hear the voices ringing, they seemed to say
"You have stolen her heart, now don't go 'way!"
As we sang Love's Old Sweet Song, on Moonlight Bay.

Verse 2
Candle lights gleaming on the silent shore;
Lonely nights, dreaming till we meet once more.
Far apart, her heart is yearning, with a sigh for my returning,
With the light of love still burning, as in days of yore.

Chorus: We were sailing along on Moonlight Bay,
We could hear the voices ringing, they seemed to say
"You have stolen her heart, now don't go 'way!"
As we sang Love's Old Sweet Song, on Moonlight Bay.

"You have stolen her heart, now don't go 'way!"
As we sang Love's Old Sweet Song, on Moonlight Bay.

Row, Row, Row (1912)
William Jerome


Verse 1
Young Johnnie Jones he had a cute little boat,
And all the girlies he would take for a float.
He had girlies on the shore, sweet little peaches by the score.
But Johnnie was a Wisenheimer you know,
His steady girl was Flo,
And every Sunday afternoon She'd jump in his boat and they would spoon,

Chorus 1
And then he'd row, row, row, way up the river
He would row, row, row. A hug he'd give her,
Then he'd kiss her now and then, she would tell him when,
He'd fool around and fool around, and then they'd kiss again,
And then he'd row, row, row, a little further
He would row, oh, oh, oh, oh.
Then he'd drop both his oars, take a few more encores,
And then he'd row, row, row.

Verse 2
Right in his boat he had a cute little seat,
And every kiss he stole from Flo was so sweet.
And he knew just how to row, He was a rowing Romeo.
He knew an Island where the trees were so grand,
He knew just where to land.
Then tales of love he'd tell to Flo until it was time for them to go.

Chorus 2
And then he'd row, row, row, way up the river
He would row, row, row. A hug he'd give her,
Then he'd kiss her now and then, she would tell him when,
He'd fool around and fool around, and then they'd kiss again,
And then he'd row, row, row, a little further
He would row, oh, oh, oh, oh.
With her head on his breast, then there's twenty bars rest.
And then he'd row, row, row.

And then he'd row, row, row, a little further
He would row, oh, oh, oh, oh.
Then he'd drop both his oars, take a few more encores,
And then he'd row, row, row.

 

Woodrow Wilson
28th President
1913-1917 1st term
1917-1921 2nd term

I Love A Piano (1915)
Irving Berlin

Pretty Baby (1916)
Gus Kahn

For Me and My Gal (1917)
Edgar Leslie & E. Ray Goetz

Good-bye Broadway Hello France (1917) Francis Reisner &
Benny Davis

Mademoiselle From Armentieres (World War I)
(
Hinky Dinky, Parlay-Voo)

Sister Susie's Sewing Shirts
for Soldiers
(World War I)
R.P. Weston

Over There (World War I)
George M. Cohan

Oh! How I Hate To Get Up
In The Morning
(1918)
Irving Berlin

K-K-K-Katy (WWI / 1918)
Geoffrey O'Hara
 

How 'Ya Gonna Keep 'Em Down
On The Farm After They See Paree?
  (1919)
Sam M. Lewis & Joe Young

Mandy (1919)
Irving Berlin

Oh! By Jingo!  Oh By Gee, You're The Only Girl for Me (1919)
Lew Brown

Ma He's Making Eyes At Me (1921)
Sidney Clare
 

I Love A Piano (1915)
Irving Berlin

Verse 1
As a child, I went wild when a band played,
How I ran to the man when his hand swayed,
Clarinets were my pets and a slide trombone I thought was simply divine.
But today, when they play, I could hiss them,
Ev'ry bar is a jar to my system.
But there's one musical instrument that I call mine:

Chorus
I love a piano, I love a piano, I love to hear somebody play
Upon a piano, a grand piano, it simply carries me away
I know a fine way to treat a Steinway,
I love to run my fingers o'er the keys, the ivories.
And with the pedal, I love to meddle, when Paderewski comes this way,
I'm so delighted, if I'm invited to hear a long-haired genius play.
So you can keep your fiddle and your bow, give me a p-i-a-n-o, oh, oh,
I love to stop right beside an upright, or a high-toned baby grand.

Verse 2
When a green Tetrazine starts to warble,
I grow cold as an old piece of marble,
I allude to the crude little party sing-r who don't know when to pause
At her best I detest the soprano,
But I run to the one at the piano.
I always love the ac-comp'niment and that's because:

Pretty Baby (1916)
Gus Kahn


Verse 1
You ask me why I'm always teasing you,
You hate to have me call you Pretty Baby;
I really thought that I was pleasing you,
For you're just a baby to me.
Your cunning little dimples and your baby stare,
Your baby talk and baby walk and curly hair;
Your baby smile makes life worth while,
You're just as sweet as you can be.

Chorus
Ev'ry body loves a baby that's why I'm in love with you,
Pretty Baby, Pretty Baby;
And I'd like to be your sister, brother, dad and mother too,
Pretty Baby, Pretty Baby;
Won't you come and let me rock you in my cradle of love,
And we'll cuddle all the the time.
Oh! I want a Lovin' Baby and it might as well be you,
Pretty Baby of mine.

Verse 2
Your mother says you were the cutest kid;
No wonder, dearie that I'm wild about you,
And all the cunning things you said and did.
Why, I love to fondly recall,
And just like Peter Pan, it seems you'll always be,
The same sweet, cunning, Little Baby dear to me.
And that is why I'm sure that I will
Always love you best of all.

 

For Me and My Gal (1917)
Edgar Leslie & E. Ray Goetz

Verse 1
What a beautiful day
For a wedding in May!
See the people all stare
At the lovable pair.
She's a vision of joy,
He's the luckiest boy.
In his wedding array
Hear him smilingly say:
Verse 2
See the relatives there
Looking oer the pair!
They can tell at a glance
It's a loving romance.
It's a wonderful sight
As the fam'lies unite.
Gee ! it makes the boy proud
As he says to the crowd:  


Chorus:
The bells are ringing for me and my gal,
The birds are singing for me and my gal.
Eve'rybody's been knowing
To a wedding they're going,
And for weeks they've been sewing,
Ev'ry Susie and Sal.
They're congregating for me and my gal,
The Parson's waiting for me and my gal.
And sometime I'm goin' to build a little home for two,
For three or four, or more,
In loveland for me and my gal.

Good-bye Broadway Hello France (1917)
Francis Reisner and Benny Davis

Verse 1
Good-bye New York town, good-bye Miss Liberty
Your light of freedom will guide us across the sea,
Ev'ry soldier's sweetheart bidding good-bye,
Ev'ry soldier's mother drying her eye
Cheer up we'll soon be there,
Singing this Yankee air:

Verse 2
Vive Pershing in the cry across the sea,
We're united in this fight for liberty,
France sent us a soldier, brave Lafayette,
Whose deeds and fame we cannot forget.
Now that we have the chance,
We'll pay our debt to France.

Chorus 1
Good-bye Broadway, Hello France,
We're ten million strong,
Good-bye sweethearts wives and mothers,
It won't take us long,
Don't you worry while we're there,
It's for you we're fighting too,
So Good-bye Broadway, Hello France,
We're going to square our debt with you

Chorus 2
Good-bye Broadway, Hello France,
We're ten million strong,
Good-bye sweethearts wives and mothers,
It won't take us long,
Don't you worry while we're there,
It's for you we're fighting too,
Good-bye Broadway, Hello France,
We're going to help you win this war.



Mademoiselle From Armentieres (World War I)
(
Hinky Dinky, Parlay-Voo)

Verse 1
Mademoiselle from Armentieres, parlay voo,
Oh, Mademoiselle from Armentieres, parlay voo,
Mademoiselle from Armentieres,
She hasn't been kissed for forty years
Hinky dinky, parlay voo.

Verse 4
From gay Paree we heard guns roar, parlay voo,
From gay Paree we heard guns roar, parlay voo,
From gay Paree we heard guns roar,
But all we heard ws "Je t'adore",
Hinky dinky, parlay voo.

Verse 2
Our top kick in Armentieres, parlay voo,
Our top kick in Armentieres, parlay voo,
Our top kick in Armentieres,
Soon broke the spell of forty years,
Hinky dinky, parlay voo.

Verse 5
You might forget the gas and shell, parlay voo,
You might forget the gas and shell, parlay voo,
You might forget the gas and shell,
You'll never forget the mademoiselle,
Hinky dinky, parlay voo.

Verse 3
The officers get all the steaks, parlay voo,
The officers get all the steaks, parlay voo,
The officers get all the steaks,
And all we get is a belly ache,
Hinky dinky, parlay voo.
 

Sister Susie's Sewing Shirts for Soldiers (World War I)
R.P. Weston

Verse 1
Sister Susie's sewing in the kitchen on a "Singer,"
There's miles and miles of flannel on the floor and up the stairs,
And father says it's rotten getting mixed up with the cotton,
And sitting on the needles that she leaves upon the chairs.
And should you knock at our street door, Ma whispers "Come inside,"
Then when you ask where Susie is, she says with loving pride:

Chorus
"Sister Susie's sewing shirts for soldiers,
Such skill at sewing shirts our shy young sister Susie shows!
Some soldiers send epistles, say they'd rather sleep in thistles
Than the saucy soft short shirts for soldiers sister Susie sews."

Verse 2
Piles and piles and piles of shirts she sends off to the soldiers,
And sailors won't be jealous when they see them, not at all,
And when we say her stitching will set all the soldiers itching,
She says our soldiers fight best when their back's against the wall,
And little brother Gussie, he who lisps when he says, "Yes,"
Says, "Where's the cotton gone from off my kite, oh I can gueth!"

Verse 3
I forgot to tell you that our sister Susie's married,
And when she isn't sewing shirts, she's sewing other things,
Then little sister Molly says, "Oh, sister's bought a dolly,
She's making all the clothes for it with pretty bows and strings."
Says Susie, "Don't be silly" as she blushes and she sighs,
Then mother smiles and whispers with a twinkle in her eyes.

Over There (World War I)
George M. Cohan

Verse 1
Johnnie get your gun, get your gun, get your gun,
Take it on the run, on the run, on the run;
Hear them calling you and me;
Ev'ry son of liberty.
Hurry right away, no delay, go today,
Make your dady glad, to have had such a lad,
Tell your sweetheart not to pine,
To be proud her boy's in line.

Chorus
Over there, over there,
Send the word, send the word, over there,
That the Yanks (boys) are coming, the Yanks (boys) are coming,
The drums rum-tumming ev'ry where.
So prepare, say a pray'r
Send the word, send the word to beware,
We'll be over, we're coming over,
And we won't come back till it's over over there.

Verse 2
Johnnie get your gun, get your gun, get your gun,
Johnnie show the Hun, you're a son-of-a-gun,
Hoist the flag and let her fly,
Like true heroes do or die.
Pack your little kit, show your grit, do your bit,
Soldiers to the ranks, from the towns and the tanks,
Make your mother proud of you,
And to liberty be true.

Chorus: Over there, over there,
Send the word, send the word, over there,
That the Yanks (boys) are coming, the Yanks (boys) are coming,
The drums rum-tumming ev'ry where.
So prepare, say a pray'r
Send the word, send the word to beware,
We'll be over, we're coming over,
And we won't come back, no we won't come back,
And we won't come back till it's over over there.

Oh! How I Hate To Get Up In The Morning (1918)
Irving Berlin

Verse 1
The other day I chanced to meet a soldier friend of mine
He'd been in camp for sev'ral weeks and he was looking fine
His muscles had developed and his cheeks were rosy red
I asked him how he liked the life, and this is what he said:

Chorus
Oh! How I Hate To Get Up In The Morning,
Oh! How I'd love to remain in bed
For the hardest blow of all is to hear the bugler call
You've got to get up, you've got to get up, you've got to get up this morning!
Someday I'm going to murder the bug-ler
Someday they're going to find him dead
I'll amputate his reveille and stomp upon it heavily
And spend the rest of my life in bed

Verse 2:
A bugler in the army is the luckiest of men:
He wakes the boys at five and then goes back to bed again
He doesn't have to blow again until the afternoon
If ev'rything goes well with me I'll be a bugler soon

Chorus

K-K-K-Katy (World War I / 1918)
Geoffrey O'Hara

Jimmy was a soldier brave and bold,
Katy was a maid with hair of gold,
Like an act of fate,
Kate was standing at the gate,
Watching all the boys on dress parade.
Jimmy with the girls was just a gawk,
Stuttered ev'ry time he tried to talk,
Still that night at eight,
He was there at Katy's gate,
Stuttering to her this love sick cry.

K-K-K-Katy, beautiful Katy,
You're the only g-g-g-girl that I adore;
When the m-m-m-moon shines,
Over the cowshed,
I'll be waiting at the k-k-k-kitchen door.
K-K-K-Katy, beautiful Katy,
You're the only g-g-g-girl that I adore;
When the m-m-m-moon shines,
Over the cowshed,
I'll be waiting at the k-k-k-kitchen door.

No one ever looked so nice and neat,
No one could be just as cute and sweet,
That's what Jimmy thought,
When the wedding ring he bought,
Now he's off to France the foe to meet.
Jimmy thought he'd like to take a chance,
See if he could make the Kaiser dance,
Stepping to a tune,
All about the silv'ry moon,
This is what they hear in far off France.

K-K-K-Katy, beautiful Katy,
You're the only g-g-g-girl that I adore;
When the m-m-m-moon shines,
Over the cowshed,
I'll be waiting at the k-k-k-kitchen door.
K-K-K-Katy, beautiful Katy,
You're the only g-g-g-girl that I adore;
When the m-m-m-moon shines,
Over the cowshed,
I'll be waiting at the k-k-k-kitchen door.

 

How 'Ya Gonna Keep 'Em Down On The Farm After They See Paree?  (1919)
Sam M. Lewis & Joe Young

Verse 1
"Reuben, Reuben, I've been thinking,"said his wifey dear;
"Now that all is peaceful and clam the boys will soon be back on the farm"
Mister Reuben, started winking, and slowly rubbed his chin:
He pulled his chair up close to mother, ane he hasked her with a grin:

Chorus 1
How 'ya gonna keep 'em, down on the farm,
After they've seen Paree?
How 'ya gonna keep 'em away from Broadway;
Jazzin' aroun' and paintin' the town?
How 'ya gonna keep 'em away from harm, that's a mystery;
They'll never want to see a rake or plow,
And who the deuce can parleyvous a cow?
How 'ya gonna keep 'em down on the farm,
After they've seen Paree?

Verse 2
"Reuben, Reuben, you're mistaken, said his wifey dear;
"Once a farmer, always a jay, and farmers always stick to the hay,
"Mother Rueben, I'm not fakin', tho' you may think it strange;
But wine and women play this mischief, with a boy who'se loose with change."

Chorus 2
How 'ya gonna keep 'em, down on the farm,
After they've seen Paree?
How 'ya gonna keep 'em away from Broadway;
Jazzin' aroun' and paintin' the town?
How 'ya gonna keep 'em away from harm, that's a mystery;
Imagine Reuben when he meets his pa,
He'll kiss his cheek and hollar "OO-LA-LA!"
How 'ya gonna keep 'em down on the farm,
After they've seen Paree?

 

Mandy (1919)
Irving Berlin

Verse
I was strolling out one evening, By the silv'ry moon,
I could hear somebody singing a familiar tune,
So I stopped a while to listen, not a word I wanted to miss,
It was just somebody serenading, some-thing like this:

Chorus
Mandy, there's a minister handy,
And it sure would be dandy, if we'd let him make a fee,
So don't you linger, here's the ring for your finger,
Isn't it a humdinger?
Come along and let the wedding chimes bring happy times,
For Man-dy and me.

Oh! By Jingo!  Oh By Gee, You're The Only Girl for Me (1919)
Lew Brown

Verse 1
In the land of San Domingo, lived a girl called Oh! by Jingo
Ta Da Da Da Da Da Da Da, Ump-a, Ump-a, Ump-a, Ump-a,
Ffrom the fields and from the marshes, came the old and young by goshes,
Ta Da Da Da Da Da Da Da, Ump-a, Ump-a, Ump-a, Ump-a,
They all spoke with a diff'rent lingo, but they all loved Oh ! by Jingo
Anad ev'ry night, they sang in the pale moonlight;

Verse 2
Oh! by Jingo had a lover, he was always undercover,
Ta Da Da Da Da Da Da Da, Ump-a, Ump-a, Ump-a, Ump-a,
Ev'ry night she used to meet him, oh how nice she used to treat him,
Ta Da Da Da Da Da Da Da, Ump-a, Ump-a, Ump-a, Ump-a,
They eloped but they both were collard, and the gang stood there and hollered,
Don't raise a fuss, you've gotta take one of us.

Chorus
Oh! By Gee! By Gosh, By Gum, By Juv
Oh By Jingo, won't you hear our love
We will build for you a hut, you will be our fav'rite nut
We'll have a lot of little oh by gollies,
Then we'll put them in the follies
By Jingo said, By Gosh, By Gee, by jimminy please don't bother me
So they all went away singing
Oh! By Gee! By Gosh, By Gum, By Juv , by Jingo,
By Gee, your're the only girl for me.

Ma He's Making Eyes At Me (1921)
Sidney Clare

Verse 1

Little Lilly was oh so silly and shy,
And all the fellows knew,
She woudn't bill and coo,
Ev'ry single night some smart fellow would try,
To cuddle up to her,
But she would cry;

Chorus 1
"Ma," he's making eyes at me, "Ma, he's awful nice to me,
"Ma, he's almost breaking my heart,
I'm beside him, mercy let his conscience guide him;
"Ma, he wants to marry me, be my honey bee,
Ev'ry minute he gets bolder,
Now he's leaning on my shoulder, "Ma, he's kissing me."

Verse 2
Lilly was so good, everybody could tell,
You'd never see her roam,
She'd always stay at home,
All the neighbors knew little Lily too well,
For when the boys would call;
They'd hear her yell;

Chorus 2
"Ma," he's making eyes at me, "Ma, he's awful nice to me,
"Ma, he's almost breaking my heart,
If you peek in, can't you see I'm goin' to weakin'
"Ma, he wants to marry me, be my honey bee,
Ma I'm meeting with resistance,
I shall holler for assistance, Ma, he's kissing me."

 

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